Pretend You’re Dead

I have climbed my last mountain. My knees can’t take another ascent. And, even worse, another fall. I have been asked by other old people, what I would like for my legacy. When I’m dead, legacy won’t matter to me. I know a lot of dead people. In fact, I know more dead people than I do people who are alive. Most of the dead people I know could care less at this point about legacy. George Washington could care less about revolution. George Washington Carver doesn’t give a hoot about peanuts. And, nether does, Charles Schultz. So I’ve decided, while I am still alive, to live like I’m dead. At my age, that makes more sense than trying to score more points in a losing cause. Here are a few of the dead people I know personally: my great grandmother King, who made a mean biscuit; my grandfather Craddock, who died feeding chickens; my grandmother Craddock, who excelled at fried corn, my grandfather Womack, who had a spittoon; my grandmother Womack, who made me eat stewed tomatoes; my dad, who played piano with one hand; my mother, who played piano with both hands; my brother Jerry, who could also play the piano but couldn’t hum the melody of life; and my wife Diane, who knew me like a book. Thank goodness she loved books!     Two of these men are dead. One is not.Can you tell the difference?  Live as if your life doesn’t matter because eventually it won’t. When you are young, you own the world. In middle life, the world owns you. In old age,...

Turn Around and Take a Look at Yourself

Reviewed by Rick O’Shay This is the third and final book in a series of self-help tomes written by the Father of Artificial Intelligence, Larry Womack.  The other books are The Grass is Always Browner and Never Take Advice Lying Down. This book, Turn Around and Take a Look at Yourself, is the basis of a new three-day seminar conducted by Womack in appropriate settings throughout the nation.  Look for one near you. Here is a brief synopsis of the book, Turn Around and Take a Look at Yourself. Chapter One:  Success May be Closer Than It Appears in the Mirror Womack says, “Learn why what you’re doing right now may be all the success you ever have.  Consider when people say you are stupid that they may be right.  Sometimes learning to live in mediocrity is a good thing.”  He suggests that if you feel you need a motivational speaker to get you going, it might be wiser just to find something not as taxing to do.  “Your glass may always be half-empty, “ says Womack.  “But on the bright side, many people don’t even have a glass.” The information in this chapter will put you well on your way to accepting your own inadequacies and developing a plan to maximize them. Chapter Two:  Learn from Your Ignorance Womack demonstrates how you can save time and energy by relying on your own ignorance and the ignorance of others to develop your opinions. He suggests using the Internet as a primary source of truth and opinion.  That way no one can challenge what you say because there is no evidence...

Benjamin Franklin Method For Living By Virtues

FORWARD “A good example is the best sermon.” – BF Since elementary school, when I first heard the myth of Benjamin Franklin discovering electricity by flying a kite in a thunderstorm with a key dangling from it, he has been my hero.   Emulating Franklin has been a lifelong quest.  He was an inventor, musician, negotiator, advisor, rogue, sage, writer, epicurean, entertainer, and elitist.  All attributes to which I have aspired.  And, like Franklin, I too have flown kites in rainstorms with some successes and many failures. My first book report, in the fourth grade, was a small Benjamin Franklin biography.  Since then I have read all there is to read about him and patterned some of my interest to match his.  I have made money as a musician, entertainer, writer, and advisor.  And, been identified as an elitist, epicurean, sage and a rogue.  Match my photo on this book jacket with a one hundred dollar bill, and you will see that as I have aged I have even come to resemble Benjamin Franklin! During my final career, that of a business and marketing consultant, I used an exercise in workshops based on Benjamin Franklin’s Method for Living by Virtues.   Franklin identified thirteen virtues by which he desired to live his life and each day until his death measured his progress.  Several decades ago, I adopted my own set of virtues and used a process similar to his to measure my own virtuous progression.  It was through my process and from request of those who attended my workshops this tome was born.   My hope is you will find the information...